The latest news and views about the Trentham Golf Club.

Competition tee times from early morning

The committee and the match committee have determined that competition teetimes on Thursdays and Saturdays will now be available from early morning until 12.30pm. Members have been entering competitions well before 8.30 for some time, this policy just formalises the preference that members have already made with their bookings. The availability of competition credits for payment, booking sheets for entry and score recording through MiScore or touchscreen has made this easily manageable.

Gender composition of groups within all competition tee times is up to individual choice and preference.

Public tee times on Thursdays and Saturdays are still limited to before 8.30am and after 12.30pm. If you book into a competition earlier than 8.30am, be prepared to share the course with, and be courteous to, green fee players.

The last competition tee time is still 12.30pm in order to wrap up the competition as close to 5.00pm as possible.

A huge thank you

When we surveyed the course after the storm on June 9, we wondered how we would ever clear it to be playable again. However, with some simply great work from everyone we've managed to do it! This help has come from:

  • Our greens staff, Bob Dobinson and Sam Bruton, and their assistants John Bell and Mark Fisher, who have done an amazing job in often wet conditions.
  • All the volunteer members who have helped on the course, from chainsawing to clearing, raking and piling, or simply providing lunches to workers.
  • Volunteer greens staff who have come from other clubs, as far away as Portland and Portsea!
  • Arborists, machinery operators and mulchers that we have hired to do work in a professional and timely manner
  • Committee members who have organised working bees (big cheer to Geoff Durham!) and a host of administrative requirements for organisation and help.

A special thanks to neighbouring clubs who offered their courses to Trentham members while our course was out of action. It was really appreciated by members, and shows the spirit of co-operation that exists within golf.

So a great big Trentham Golf Club thankyou to everyone!


Volunteer members, visitors and greens staff all did a magnificent job to re-open the course.

STORM PHOTO GALLERY

Photo comparison 1946 to now: what a change!

Trentham Golf Club was first formed in 1937. The club commenced by leasing land for a 9-hole course on land owned by the Trentham Co-operative Society. In October 1949, the club purchased all the land owned by the Co-operative Society and over 60 years has developed the course we have today.

To compare what the course looked like in 1946 to what it looks like today, click the link below. The historic aerial photo from 1946 shows the Trentham Co-operative Society's yards and slaughterhouse just forward of the 4th tee among the large cypress trees, most of which still exist. The club's sand greens show as white dots, some in the same place as today's greens. Some trees existed in 1949, such as those around the 15th tee, the large Manna gum on the hill on the corner of the 16th, and some roadside trees. But nearly all trees on the course, native and exotic, have been planted since the land was purchased in 1949.

Compare the course from 1946 to now ...

Say hello to Tim and Oliver

Our course marshall and his sidekick dog!

Course Marshall Tim Fletcher does a great job checking green fee payments and helping visitors with any questions on-course at Trentham. While Tim plays on Thursdays and Saturdays, he also rides the course regularly on Sundays and mid-week from his nearby home. Always accompanying him in his cart is his faithful Boxer dog named Oliver.

Tim came to the town a few years ago from Barwon Heads where he is still a member. However he says he prefers the Trentham lifestyle. While Tim plays, Oliver sits patiently on the seat and doesn't move until the end of the round. 

This golfing life

by Neil Aplin

The piercing whistle of the 6.15am train wakes me and the regional town from our nightly slumbers. Birds fly into a dull morning light and I have a moment of panic. For years that train provided my daily commute to the city and work and my mind still equates that train whistle with being punctual.

But I am newly retired and I can now listen to the bird calls and ponder my plans for the day. This new life heralds a raft of opportunities. Bush walks, gardening, travel, and family get-togethers. Most often my day is spent with mates playing golf on one of the region’s prettiest courses. A quiet glass of wine at the 19th hole contrasts with a tepid latte at a city cafe discussing the latest project with a colleague.

The golf course provides a wealth of birdlife and the evidence of nocturnal visits of various animals. I can rely on seeing a gathering of superb fairy wrens in front of the 16th tee set adjacent to a spring-fed stream and protective thorny bushes. An owl often sits high above the fifth green casting a wise eye over the putting on the theatre below. Kookaburras can often be heard laughing at the awkward approach swings or catching a frog in the dam adjacent to the 13th hole. The complaining frog is dispatched with several whacks across a nearby log by the kookaburra. A variety of parrots, galahs, sulphur-crested cockatoos and the destructive little corellas add colour and noise across the course. The corellas ignore the efforts of the greenkeeper’s scarecrows and dangling CDs, often wreaking havoc on their favourite 11th green overnight.

swans

The creek that skirts the eastern boundary feeds a local waterfall and visitor attraction. Before it plunges over the rocks, it is dammed to provide water for the thirsty course. The dam adjacent to the 12th fairway is home to a myriad of waterfowl and errant golf balls; there are heron, egrets, black swans, the white ibis and of course the wood and mallard ducks. Nesting in the safety of the reed banks are the purple swamp hens. The ducks and hens forage on the fairway and risk injury as golfers play their tee shots.

For the early golfers, the sand bunkers provide footprints of the kangaroos, dogs and wombats who traipse across the course each night. The seventh and ninth tees usually display the cuboid spoors of the wombat. The odd echidna will find its way across the practice fairway.

My sleep which used to jostle with the demands of clients now recreates the few good shots of the day. The blast of a train whistle interrupts my dreams. “That is my train and I don’t need to be on it”, I tell my wife as I roll over.

Trentham wins 2019 Victorian Golf Club of the Year


Trentham President Keith Webster accepts the award on behalf of the club.

Trentham Golf Club is the 2019 Victorian Golf Club of the Year. The award was decided at the Victorian Golf Industry Awards presentation at the Arts Centre, Melbourne on Friday August 9.

The award recognises the club's outstanding recent performance in management, including financial management, water security, membership retention, innovative flexible memberships, our popular annual tournament, comprehensive web site, other online technology usage such as membership payments and tournament entry, member communication, volunteering, our environment plan, and beginner clinics, especially for women.

Over the years, the club has developed the course and rebuilt all greens to USGA standards, developed social media usage (our Facebook page now has 1325 followers), instituted OneGolf competition management, developed a great food offering and visitor welcoming through our “Birdie Kitchen”, remotely monitored the clubhouse for security and installed our green fee ticket machine.


Trentham Committee member Anne Cooper and President Keith Webster are pictured with the award.

In other good news, Trentham member and resident Stuart Leong, who coaches at Metropolitan Golf Club and also part-time at Trentham, won the 2019 Victorian PGA Coach of the Year Award. Well done Stuart.

Strategic plan available

The Trentham Golf Club Strategic Plan was adopted by the Committee in August 2018. It is a document that acts as a workable plan for the future development of the club. It tries to plan for everything that will contribute to building this great club. You can download a copy of the Strategic Plan.

The plan is fluid and flexible, and may change with future opportunities. While very important, it is not just about course infrastructure. The over-riding emphasis has been to foster and build a club with an atmosphere of friendship, civility and respect on a beautiful and challenging course, so that all members enjoy and value their membership.

The hard work begins with its implementation. We would like as many members as possible to become involved with implementing the plan. This is the joint responsibility of not only the Committee but all of us, and requires the commitment and goodwill of all.

The Strategic Plan sub-committee was Keith Webster, John Hudson, Ron Winzer, Geoff Durham and Colin Wilson. They will be happy to discuss any aspect of the plan.

Not receiving e-mails from the club?

If you are a member and you are not receiving member e-mails from the club through the club2ic.com system, please try one of the following:

1. If you are using an e-mail address such as Hotmail or Gmail, please check your 'Junk' folder regularly. Sometimes high spam protection settings cause legitimate e-mails to be send to 'Junk'. To stop our e-mails going to 'Junk', make sure you have an entry for Trentham Golf Club in either your Contacts or Safe Senders list, using the club e-mail domain (@trenthamgolf.com.au). The club e-mail is also in the front of the program book, or we can supply it on request using the Contact Us form on this website.

2. We may not have your correct e-mail address, or any e-mail address for you at all. We have tried very hard to gather everyone's e-mail addresses, but there are still a handful of members that don't have an e-mail address on the system. Please send your e-mail address to the club using the contact form on this website.